No Picture

Behind the Scenes

There are many community members at the Friends’ Central School who do amazing things but go unnoticed. There is trash often found outside of the Blackburn Library at the picnic tables, which is both disrespectful to our community members and disgusting. We, as a community, should clean up after ourselves and keep our campus beautiful.




No Picture

Letter from the FOCUS Editors-in-Chief

by Julia Barr ’15 and Jessica Miller ’15 This spring, FOCUS editors Emilia Weinberg and Peter Dissinger approached the Middle School newspaper, The Phoenix Inquirer, about bringing our two school newspapers together. What began as a workshop coordinated by our soon-departing FOCUS editors resulted in this collaborative issue, created by the staff of both newspapers. More important and memorable for us than the product of this collaboration, however, is the experience and knowledge gained from having worked together. The process of putting together this issue was a learning experience for both middle schoolers and high schoolers in working together as a team, seeing how the other’s newspaper is run, and gaining knowledge and experience to apply to their own newspapers in the future. For us as the new editor-in-chiefs of FOCUS, this was also our first try at publishing an issue, and we are so glad that we were able to share this…


No Picture

Life in the Upper School

by Caroline Bartholomew ’15, Anthony Candelori-Moraglia ’16, Sophie Geagan ’18, Beth Pipes ’18, and Evan Sweitzer ’20 As the Middle and Upper School newspapers worked together on this collaborative issue, we realized that there were many things that we did not know about each other. Until now, the different parts of our school have been separated, but now we are joining together as “OneFCS” to learn and share, respectively, about life as an upper schooler from the writers and editors of FOCUS. As middle schoolers who will soon be going to upper school, we were curious to learn what the upper schoolers had to say about life in the Upper School. SG, BP, and ES: What is the most important thing you have learned in your Upper School experience? CB and ACM: Learning to have an open mind. There are a lot of opportunities in Upper School, so students learn to…


No Picture

A Soundtrack to Life at FCS

by Zoe Ginsberg ’17, Anjali Gupta ’18, and Talia Rosenberg ’17 Anjali Gupta of The Phoenix Inquirer recently embarked on a mission with FOCUS staff members Talia Rosenberg and Zoe Ginsberg to form a playlist that represents life at Friends’ Central. This soundtrack includes favorite classic songs like Swimming to the Other Side along with new pop songs such as Same Love or Happy. The main theme of these songs is love and acceptance of yourself and others. Each of these songs carries an important message with them that connects back to the values instilled at Friends’ Central every single day. At FCS, everyone’s love holds the same meaning, no matter if it is a boy who loves a guy, a girl who loves a girl, or any relationship in between. At our school, the goal is to maintain a safe and healthy environment through acceptance and love, and we believe that the…


No Picture

Middle School, Then and Now

by Jream Barnett-Matthews ’19, Natasha Guy ’16, Pierce Hayton ’20, Elizabeth Raphaely ’16, and Gordon Wilcox ’20 Friends’ Central proudly maintains many traditions in the Middle School on which even upper schoolers can still look back fondly. One of these is the always-fun Phoenix Game Day, the final hoorah to a successful school year. Always balancing competitive spirit with good-natured fun, this day is still significant in the lives of current middle schoolers at Friends’ Central, providing some of the most treasured memories of middle school. Collecting pop tabs for the Ronald McDonald house is not only fun because it contributes to the points of a team, but it also emphasizes the service component that is essential to the Friends’ Central experience. Another tradition essential to the Friends’ Central Middle School experience is the week-long 7th grade trip to the overnight camp Echo Hill, located on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. Echo…


No Picture

“Will Grayson, Will Grayson,” “Daylight Saving,” and “Beautiful Creatures”

  “Catherine and Claudia’s Top Spring Reads” will be a recurring feature in the final months of the 2013-2014 school year. If you’re looking for your next independent reading book for Language Arts or are in need of a good read for summer, look no further! Summaries and ratings of three books will be published every two weeks. Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan is about two boys named Will Grayson. Will Grayson 1 is trying to go through life unnoticed. Will Grayson 2 goes through life without anything to hold on to except an online relationship with a boy named Isaac. Both characters go on a trip and find out that neither of them are the only Will Grayson in their city.  Stars: 8/10 Rating: PG-13 Daylight Saving by Edward Hogan is about a boy named Daniel. Daniel’s dad takes him on a vacation to a sports complex, where Daniel meets Lexi,…


No Picture

Summer Blockbusters: 5 Action Thrillers Reviewed and Previewed

This summer, there are a variety of major action thrillers coming to theaters and we have decided to preview and review this summer’s box-office biggies. Some of the movies we decided to review are The Amazing Spider Man 2, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Godzilla, X-Men: Days of Future Past, and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. We believed The Amazing Spider Man 2 was an action-filled movie. There were also some jaw-dropping special effects in this thriller. However, we thought it had a little too much action and the plot was predictable. We give this movie a 7.5/10 rating. Captain America: The Winter Soldier had a very predictable plot, but we also thought there were a lot of interesting fight scenes and special effects. We give Captain America: The Winter Soldier a 6.5/10 rating.


No Picture

YA Writer Alex London Visits FCS

Have you read Proxy yet? Proxy is a “futuristic thriller,” according to Miss Schwoebel’s book talk video. This young adult novel tells the story of Knox, a boy from a wealthy family, and Syd, a boy who has to pay Knox’s debt. Proxy takes place in a dystopia where there is debt that makes the poor become proxies and take punishments for the rich. This amazing book was written by Alex London. If you have ever read this book, you have probably wondered, “Why did it end that way?!” Well… Mr. London has released a sequel to Proxy, titled Guardian. On Tuesday, May 13, Mr. London came to our school to talk about Proxy and his new book, Guardian. Mr. London also offered a writing workshop to a few Language Arts classes! This class was not just any workshop; we wrote a dystopian fairy tale. We were honored that we were able to receive copies of Guardian before the world did, so I hope you did…


Skip to toolbar