How To Control Reply-All Emails When Sending To An Email Group

We all love to share good news with everyone in our community, but sometimes, the reply emails from many people in everyone’s inboxes creates more noise than is necessary. There is a way to control the reply emails that are generated when you use a group email address to send out a message. You can use the Bcc, or Blind carbon copy (in some places it is called blind courtesy copy) option when sending emails to a large email group.  This allows the only the sender of a message to receive all replies to the original email message. This post isn’t to keep you from sending emails throughout the community, it is to make you more mindful of what you are sending and what impact reply-all emails can have on someone else’s inbox. In addition to email, be aware that we have a Google+ Community that is a good place to share information.

How to use the Bcc: when composing an email

When you begin to compose an email to an email group, the Bcc option will show up on the right side of the compose box.

Select Bcc in the compose box
Select Bcc in the compose box

Chose that link and and a new box will appear where you type in the email addresses you are sending the message to.

Type the addresses you want to send your message to
Type the addresses you want to send your message to

 

Add Events To Google Calendar From Gmail

If you do a lot of scheduling over email, it’s now a little bit easier to create events directly from your Gmail. Starting today, dates and times within emails are lightly underlined: click them to schedule that conference call or lunch date without ever leaving Gmail. If you do a lot of scheduling over email, it’s now a little bit easier to create events directly from your Gmail. Starting today, dates and times within emails are lightly underlined: click them to schedule that conference call or lunch date without ever leaving Gmail.

calendar

When you click on one of these underlined dates, you’ll be able to preview your schedule for the day and change the title, date or time of the event. Clicking “Add to Calendar” will do exactly that — add the event to your calendar, and for extra convenience, the calendar event will include a link back to the original email.

via: gmailblog.blogspot.com

Undo Send Email Messages In Gmail

If you make a typo or regret sending a message, you can undo the action by enabling the “Undo send” option.

This gives you the option to take back a message you just sent for up to 30 seconds. Turn on Undo Send by clicking Settings, and you’ll see a new “Undo” link on every sent mail confirmation. Click “Undo,” and Gmail grab the message before it’s sent and take you right back to compose.

Here’s how to set it up:

With Gmail open, click the gear icon in the top right and then select Settings.

Scroll until you find Undo Send. Check the box next to Enable Undo Send and select a cancellation period from 5-30 seconds.

 

Be sure to save- scroll to the bottom and click Save Changes.

Gmail and Drive – a new way to send files

You can insert files from Drive directly into an email without leaving your Gmail.

Have you ever tried to attach a file to an email only to find out it’s too large to send? Now with Drive, you can insert files up to 10GB — 400 times larger than what you can send as a traditional attachment. Also, because you’re sending a file stored in the cloud, all your recipients will have access to the same, most-up-to-date version.

Like a smart assistant, Gmail will also double-check that your recipients all have access to any files you’re sending. This works like Gmail’s forgotten attachment detector: whenever you send a file from Drive that isn’t shared with everyone, you’ll be prompted with the option to change the file’s sharing settings without leaving your email. It’ll even work with Drive links pasted directly into emails.

 

So whether it’s photos from your recent camping trip, video footage from your brother’s wedding, or a presentation to your teacher, all your stuff is easy to find and easy to share with Drive and Gmail. To get started, just click on the Drive icon while you’re composing a message. Note that this feature is rolling out over the next few days and is only available with Gmail’s new compose experience, so you’ll need to opt-in if you haven’t already.
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Why I can’t live without the archive button

If I were stuck on a desert island with only 1 thing, it would be pretty difficult to choose between a survival expert and my trusty archive button.

While it may seem obvious that the survival expert is the way to go, the Archive button in Gmail, which looks like this, , is pretty essential to my everyday survival.

Archiving lets you tidy up your inbox by moving messages from your inbox into your All Mail label, so you don’t have to delete anything. It’s like moving something into a filing cabinet for safekeeping, rather than putting it in the trash can.

Any message you’ve archived can be found by clicking the “All Mail” label on the left side of your Gmail page. You can also find a message you’ve archived by clicking on any other labels you’ve applied to it, or by searching for it by email author or keywords.

When someone responds to a message you’ve archived, the conversation containing that message will reappear in your inbox.

To archive messages, Read More below.

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This Email Tastes Like Spam

One of the issues we face with the glut of incoming email is trying to determine if an email we get is legitimate or just junk or spam. There are some easy ways to determine if an email you received is actually for you or just someone trying to get you to click on a link. This post will help you determine the difference between your real and junk messages and protect you from potential harm to both your computer and your identity.

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